Posts Tagged ‘painting doors’

Load Balancing

December 13, 2008

superfab What is Load Balancing?

Years ago I conducted a study on how far various roller covers can carry a load of paint. You can see an example in the photo. I wanted to know how much more distance can I get out of all the 1/2" covers available to me and find the best one. Then I wanted to compare the 1/2" covers against 3/4" covers of the same brand to see how much more distance I can get using a 3/4" cover assuming a desired roller texture. The same study was conducted on brushes.

Load balancing is gauged on the capacity of the brush or roller and the amount of paint you load them with for optimum results. Each load (amount of paint) is predetermined before taking the load based on for example where it will be placed on the wall or trim.

Load Balancing is one of the more important aspects with efficient painting. It’s a combination between the right paint brush or roller and the amount of paint in which you load them and how it impacts performance more than anything else.

Load Balancing allows me to paint ridiculously fast because each (next move) or next load of paint is thought out. What this does is eliminates unnecessary brushwork and/or more effective results with each load of paint.

In the video where the side of the casing is painted in about 8 seconds, Load Balancing plays a huge role in allowing me to do that. 1) The brush needs to be capable of holding a load of paint to go the distance of 7’. 2) I also need to know how much paint I will need to travel 7’ and put that amount of paint on the brush.

Look for more on this topic soon along with video demonstrations. For now you can see more on this topic here.

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Spraying & Racking

November 8, 2008

 
Spraying Balusters Down
Spraying Trim & Doors
Baluster Spray Rack
Setup Doors to Spray
Split Spindle System
HVLP Dialing in
HVLP Maintenance
HVLP Transfer Efficiency
Clean-n-dip Review
Racking 5 1/2" Baseboard
Racking Trim
Full Sheen Ahead
Corrective Finishes

trim rack

Ext. SuperPaint Woes

October 25, 2007

Here are a few tips for dealing with difficult colors using Sherwin Williams Exterior SuperPaint.

For the purpose of this article I am referring to a ‘difficult color’ as any color that will not cover easily in two coats such as reds, deep greens, midnight blues, pastels etc.

General Tips: For best results with most any paint product when it comes time to paint an exterior front door, try to paint 1) early morning, 2) not in direct sunlight and 3) not in windy conditions. Keep all windows and other doors closed while you paint. This will decrease the amount of draft passing by the door. Sun and wind are the enemies. I will postpone however long I have to for optimum conditions to paint a front door. This is important, brace the door in a way that it will not move while you are painting it.

Painting front doors:
In the new home market we are required to paint front doors to match factory vinyl shutters manufactured by Norandex. You may experience a similar requirement with another manufacturer.

Some of our builders use metal factory primed steel doors and others use white shiny fiberglass entry doors. Typically most of these shutter paint colors cover fine in two coats over the dark grey factory primer except for 3 of them, Bordeux, Midnight Green and Midnight Blue (shown). Not all factory steel doors are primed the same shade of grey, some are very dark and others are pale grey.

If you were to brush Sherwin Williams Exterior Super Paint mixed in any one of the three colors shown you are likely to apply 4 or 5 coats to achieve full color depth over a pale grey or white fiberglass door. To work around this labor intensive process you can reprime the door with a dark grey flat primer (flatter the better) and apply two coats of finish. Or do like I do and mask the door off and spray it. More info here on spraying Trim and Doors.

If you decide to brush the door, another option is to get two quarts mixed up, have one quart mixed in Sherwin Williams Exterior Super Paint Flat and one in Satin or Semi-gloss. I do not recommend Exterior SuperPaint mixed in Gloss for doors. You have more working time with Satin than you do with Semi-Gloss. If the final result is semi-gloss then use satin for your first coat and semi-gloss for your 2nd and 3rd. If your final result is satin, then use flat for first coat and satin for the 2nd and maybe 3rd if needed.

Here is a TIP for applying Exterior Super Paint. Paint the edges first. If your door had defined panels such as a 6 panel style door, paint the inside of all panels completely first and use a damp rag to wipe wet paint away from any area but the panel. Take a look at the photo here for a numbered procedural method for painting a door. Then finish off the door using that method.

A TIP for painting the hinge edge is the same, paint the edge and as you move down the edge of the door, remove any paint with a wet rag that got on the face of the door.