Archive for the ‘refinishing’ Category

Painting Kitchen Cabinets

January 16, 2009

cabinet_001Painting kitchen cabinets is an inexpensive way to make your kitchen cabinets look like new again.

In the days ahead I am going to cover all aspects of refinishing kitchen cabinets.

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MINWAX Sanding Sealer Pt 2

November 5, 2008

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I recently posted on the MINWAX Sanding Sealer in October but after preparing for a review on sanding sealers I thought I better leave this one out. This product is not at all like the sanding sealers you are probably used to. I’m not certain I would call this product sanding sealer at all in comparison to all the others.

Here is what you should know about this applying this product.

Number one, you need to have smooth bare wood to start because this sealer will not allow you to sand off anything but lint and I’m not joking. The sealer itself doesn’t allow you to cut through it but rather sand off anything on the surface and barely at that. So if you have slight rough wood under the sealer, you wont be able to get to it.

IMG_0736a Number two, If you apply this product to poplar trim for example, not only will the poplar soak up the sealer like a sponge but there is no way in hell you will get it baby ass smooth like you can with any other sealer out there. If you ever sanded polyurethane, this is far worst.

The photo above shows Do It Best brand sanding sealer on the baseboard and Minwax sanding sealer on the casing, both sanded. Notice how the baseboard clearly sanded smooth and to a powder where the casing was not.

Number three, call me Caption Obvious but there is something about calling a product "sanding" sealer when you cant sand it.

MINWAX 2hr Sanding Sealer

October 22, 2008

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Sanding Sealer is the single most important component to finishing stained trim and doors yet so many people know little about it. One of the more common methods people (DIY) are using today to finish woodwork is one coat of MinWax stain and 1-2 coats of MinWax polyurethane and often they don’t bother sanding between coats.

If you want nicely finished woodwork then after you apply your stain to the trim and doors the 2nd step to finishing them is applying sanding sealer. Most sanding sealers dry super fast and can be sanded the same day but for outstanding results its best to wait a day. The sealer becomes more hardened and sands so much easier and smoother a day later.

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Use a White China or Black China brush to apply sanding sealer. The White China will provide better results and holds more vs. black china.

It is not necessary to apply sanding sealer heavily. It is important to be sure the area absorbed the sealer enough before you move on. I apply a nice load to an area and work it in quickly and move the rest of the load off into the next area. I want the area saturated but not left heavy on the surface.

6 STEPS to Smooth Woodwork

1) Stain your trim
2) Apply sanding sealer (wait 1 day)
3) Sand the sanding sealer smooth
4) Vacuum with a shop vac (some people like to use a tac-cloth too)
5) Fill nail holes
6) Apply your compatible clear coat.

More on Sanding Sealer here.

SPECIAL NOTE: If you are familiar with ICI Wood Pride Sanding Sealer, Sherwin Williams, Cabot or Benjamin Moore’s SuperSpec, the MINWAX Sanding Sealer is nothing like them. The MINWAX is more like sanding polyurethane. Its best to have your wood sanded smooth prior to staining because MINWAX Sanding Sealer will only allow you to sand what’s on the surface where the other sealers listed allow you to cut deeper than the surface.

Part 2. More on this Sealer here.

ICI Sanding Sealer

October 24, 2007
I am just going to cover briefly using ICI Dulux Wood Pride Sanding Sealer with a brush, roller and an HVLP.

We use sanding sealer as part of our wood finishing process. Once the stain is applied and dry, I apply sanding sealer to raise and lock down the grain of the wood allowing me to sand the sealer baby smooth before applying a varnish. Many guys think sanding sealers are all created equal. Here is a secret, they’re not. Sherwin Williams isn’t the same as ICI’s and neither of them are anything like MinWax Sanding Sealer or Cabots sealers. Now that Sherwin Williams has a hold on Minwax, maybe the two are the same now.

Brushing:
This product is pretty straight forward although you have little time to work with it. It is best to keep moving ahead and try not to back brush previously wet areas.

Rolling:
It is not recommended to roll sanding sealer and leave it as is. I recommend always laying off with a brush. Work in small areas and use a Mohair short nap cover.

Spraying: When using an HVLP you may find it beneficial to slightly reduce the sealer. A formula of 24 oz. sanding sealer to 8 oz. thinner is sufficient to allow fast steady flow from the gun. Reducing should allow you to dial in your gun with minimal air flow. My air flow is almost all the way to off. I use a #3 projector set for sealer.

Dealing with drips and sags:
Yep, even I get them from time to time and I highly recommend keeping an eye on your work as you go. Every so often take a look back at your work. If you can, try to remove sags with a dry oil brush by feathering the sag out. If the sag had too much time to dry but is still soft, grab your 5-in-1 and shave it off carefully. If the sag or drip has dried completely, use a single edge razor blade and shave it off very carefully, sand smooth and repair.

About the photo: The photo shows ICI sanding sealer over stained poplar.

Also look at Do it Best Sanding Sealer

Stain TIP large areas

August 31, 2007

Grab yourself one of these wool applicator pads for staining large flat areas or flush doors. You can use a paint roller tray and pour the stain in the pan leaving the ramp exposed and dab the applicator in the stain and pat a few times on the ramp to remove excess stain.

This pad can also be used for staining casing and baseboard in a racking scenario. We use penetrating stains and never wipe after applying the stain so this applicator comes in handy and improves speed drastically.

Sandpaper Time Saver

April 24, 2007
Here are the types of sandpaper I found over the years to save me time on the job. The Glit #150 extra fine works great for sanding sealer, between coats of acrylics, sanding spindles, drywall patches etc. The Glit #100 works great for sanding oil-based primer on poplar.

UPDATE: The Glit pads are now 3M Pro-Pad’s

Hermes J-Flex cloth back is an excellent paper for sanding bare wood prior to priming or staining, you’ll find other uses for it once you have some. J-Flex is a little on the pricey side but worth it to save time. J-Flex is sold in rolls. Hermes Abrasives
For the orbital sander I prefer Norton’s Gold P-150 for sanding dried latex paints on rework jobs, also works well on bare wood. Easily removes cured sags and runs.